Abandoned and Decay by Urban Explorer Urbex-Design Insanity

Meet the Dutch Photographer Mandy van Sundert who fell in love with Urban Exploring and is posting her Urbex adventures as Urbex-Design Insanity. She loves to get in her car and drive to abandoned places and capture the decay of those places or the things that are left behind in rooms.

More of Urbex-Design Insanity? Visit her website or like her page on Facebook.

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Abandoned Sanatorium Salve Mater in Belgium by Photographer Mooi Paars

Dutch Photographer Mooi Paars visited the abandoned Sanatorium Salve Mater in Belgium and shot these Urban Exploring pictures. Some background about the Mooi Paars: "I gained a degree in Photography and Graphics from the College of Art in Rotterdam. I focused on the photography and always try to include ethics and a "social conscience" in my work. It helps keep my mind fresh and always look for new approaches to a subject. I hope you enjoy my work.".

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Are mini-Segways the next must have tool for photographers?

Those mini-Segways are all the rage with celebrities, sports stars and the cool kids, but could they be the next must-have accessory for photographers?
This wedding photographer tried it out and with some practice I can see potential for a whole range of new shots and angles.

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Nascar Photographer can almost touch the cars

Its always louder, more scary, and way more asphalt in your face than you can imagine or think it'd be. That's what this photographer realized after photographing the 2009 LifeLock 400 NASCAR race at Michigan International Speedway, through the precarious vantage point of a hole in the fence over the track's Turn 1. The cars speed under him at 180 some mph, 8-10 ft between the photographer and the cars. That is what we called job dedication!

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Vincent Laforet’s Rare High Altitude Night Flight Above NYC

Filmmaker and photographer Vincent Laforet was recently on assignment for Men's Health Magazine and he proposed to them shooting New York from an unusually high altitude so that he could capture the lines that are formed by the streets of the city at night. So he leaned out of an open door of a helicopter on 7,500 feet over New York on a very dark and chilly night. But his pictures are really stunning.

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