The Olympic games are only a couple of months away and London is starting to buzz. We all know what the PR people, the IOC people and the politicians think of the games, but what does the ordinary Londoner feel for the Olympic games. Let these people tell you their opinion.

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Ian Cook, a 29 year-old artist who lives in Birmingham and works for a week in London, poses for a picture in an office window in central London, May 15, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Cook said: It's great to be a host city. There will be lots of cultural things going on. I am looking forward to it. Picture taken May 15, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Charley Osborne, a 75 year-old ex-serviceman who has lived in London for fifteen years, poses for a picture outside a pub in central London, May 15, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Osborne said: It's good for London and good for Londoners. I'm not worried about security. We have the best security in the world. Picture taken May 15, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Collum Hanway, a 15 year-old student who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in central London, May 15, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Hanway said: I'm really excited and I'm looking forward to going to some of the events. I have tickets for the syncronised diving. Picture taken May 15, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Tim McPherson, a 39 year-old falconer who works in London, poses with his hawk Harry for a picture at Trafalgar Square in central London, May 16, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, McPherson said: It's good for Britain to host it. But travelling is going to be a nightmare. Picture taken May 16, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Paul Sergio, a 35 year-old busker who has lived in London for five years, poses for a picture in central London, May 16, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Sergio said: The Olympic Games are going to be great. Picture taken May 16, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Karina Zamarska, a 23 year-old actress who has lived in London for five years, poses for a picture in central London, May 16, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Zamarska said: For London it's obviously not good becuase so many people will be here. The tourists will be asking me questions all the time. Picture taken May 16, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Dasha, a 21 year-old model who has lived in London for more than two years, poses for a picture on the banks of the river Thames in London, May 16, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Dasha said: It's not good for London. There will be too many tourists. Picture taken May 16, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Leon Campbell, a 23 year-old graphic illustrator who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in central London, May 16, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Campbell said: Personally, I'm neutral. I don't know what it will do for the city. My opinion will be made after I see the knock on effects. Picture taken May 16, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Paddy Fox, a 79 year-old Chelsea Pensioner who has lived in London for more than ten years, poses for a picture in Chelsea, London, May 17, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Fox said: I think it's fantastic. Let the world see what we are really like. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Rob Fullerton, a 46 year-old taxi driver who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in Chelsea, London, May 17, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Fullerton said: To host is really good for London. I think there's going to be issues with traffic. Hopefully, we can get around it. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Ian Fraser, a 58 year-old mechanic who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in Lambeth, London, May 17, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Fraser said: I think it's a waste of time. We are not going to benefit from it. It's bringing no financial reward to people like me. It's exclusively for the rich and famous. Picture taken May 17, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Nikita Smith, a 21 year-old drama student who has lived in London for two years, poses for a picture near Carnaby Street in London, May 21, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Smith said: I think it's a good opportunity. I don't think it's going to be too much of a change because London has so much diversity already. Picture taken May 21, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Tiziano Mazzillis, a 42 year-old fashion designer who has lived in London for twelve years, poses for a picture near Carnaby Street in London, May 21, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Mazzillis said: It's a great thing for London. I don't know if they are prepared for all the people coming, it's going to cause some aggravation for the commuters but it's amazing. Picture taken May 21, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Rosie Llewllyn, a 28 year-old childrens retailer who has lived in London for eleven years, poses with her dog Rufus for a picture near Carnaby Street in London, May 21, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Llewllyn said: I think it's great. I am not going to be here for it which I'm quite glad about. I don't have tickets but I like it when there's exciting things going on in London. Picture taken May 21, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Mash Lorne, a 60 year-old fish seller who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in Brixton, London, May 22, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Lorne said: It's a fantastic idea and we waited so long for it. It's going to be good for everyone. Picture taken May 22, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Sadiq Mohammad, a 69 year-old vendor who has lived in London for eight years, poses for a picture in Brixton, London, May 22, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Mohammad said: It's very nice. Business will be up. Picture taken May 22, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Petrica Iancu, a 20 year-old desktop support technician who has lived in London for more than a year, poses for a picture in Balham, London, May 22, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Iancu said: I think it's a good idea and is good for London's name. But it's not so good for the people who live in Stratford because of the Olympics everything gets more expensive and local people can't afford it. Picture taken May 22, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Craig Drysdale, a 57 year-old pensioner who has lived in London for twenty eight years, poses for a picture in Balham, London, May 22, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Drysdale said: I'm sceptical that it's going to bring long term benefits. We bid for it at a time when everybody was feeling optimistic about the economy. With hindsight, I'm not so sure it's going be worth it. Picture taken May 22, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Michael and Kay Deedman, 71 and 79 year-old pensioners from Hockley visiting London for a day, pose for a picture in Chelsea, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what they felt about London hosting the Olympics, Michael said: We are thrilled about it. Our granddaughter is taking part in the Paralympics, not as competitior but as a volunteer. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Esther Smedvig, a 66 year-old former management secretary who has lived in London for twenty years, poses for a picture in Chelsea, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Smedvig said: It's a brillant idea. In the beginning I thought it would have been better if the French had got it because of the disruption. But they have done a fabulous job in getting it organised and it's all on time. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Lotti Kozlow, a 24 year-old estate agent who has lived in London for six years, poses with her dog Rufus for a picture in Chelsea, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Kozlow said: I think it's a massive thing globally and it's brilliant for London but I just hope that the organising committee don't forget about the Londoners who are here all the time. When they said not to use public transport that bothered quite a few of us. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Melanie Black, a 71 year-old pensioner who has lived all her life in London, poses for a picture in Chelsea, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Black said: We can't afford it. The selling of the tickets has been extremely disorganised. But I hope it brings a lot of money for London and the country in general. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Tony Kerr, a 45 year-old underwriter who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in the City of London, May 23, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Kerr said: I think it's great for people outside London and for the UK in general. For those in London it's probably going to be a bit of a hassle. It's going to be an interruption to business generally. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Garry Green, a 44 year-old motorcycle paramedic who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in the City of London, May 23, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Green said: Personally, I think it's a good thing but it's going to cost a fortune. We're going to be paying for it for the next 20 to 30 years. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Carol Driver, a 35 year-old journalist who has lived in London for more than a year, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Driver said: For London as a whole I think it's a fantastic opportunity and it's a way to showcase our capital city to the world. In terms of Londoners, I think that we are slightly excluded and that we are going to need to make other arrangements in terms of work and getting around the city. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Alice Quon, a 23 year-old product and development manager who has just moved to London, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Quon said: I think it's amazing. I moved to London a few months ago so I'm really excited to be part of it. I've never been in a host city during the Olympics so I just want to see everything I can. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Vanessa Babirye, a 20 year-old actress who has lived all her life in London, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Babirye said: I think it's a good thing that we're hosting it here because we don't usually get things. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Joseph Wiseman, a 25 year-old PhD student who has lived in London for seven years, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Wiseman said: I think it has been a complete waste of money. It has gone way over budget and in a few years time no one will be saying it was good for London. I think it would be better if it were held in Greece all the time. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Darren Rudland, a 41 year-old fashion store staff member who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Rudland said: I'm very apprehensive over plans at the moment. But I'm interested to see the legacy of the Olympics. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Ann Shore, a stylist and creative director who has lived in London for twenty five years, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Shore said: It's exciting in the sense that London is a very invigorating and exciting city. The money spent could actually have gone to a lot better causes. I think it would be lovely if it was hosted in Greece every four years. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Deborah Blackstock, a 34 year-old mother who has lived all her life in London, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Blackstock said: It's a brilliant idea but I'm worried about the traffic. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Janvier Wete, a 20 year-old junior editor who has lived in London for fifteen years, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Wete said: It's good for London because it attracts tourists. For us Londoners there will be loads of events and loads of opportunities in terms of jobs and even volunteer work. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Ben Slow, a 28 year-old street artist who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Slow said: It's a massive waste of money. I think it will be fun for a few days but if you think of everything that's going on at the moment with the current financial situation, it's a massive waste of money. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Nash Salim, a 60 year-old accountant who has lived in London for fourty five years, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Salim said: It's brilliant. The last time we had the Olympics was 1948 so 2012 will be brilliant for us Londoners. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Joe Atwere, a 42 year-old street photographer who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Atwere said: It's going be a positive experience. It's going to bring all the cultures and communities together and hopefully it will be a good celebration of sports as well as a celebration of life. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Victoria Palmer, a 27 year-old model and jewellery designer who has lived in London for sixteen years, poses for a picture in Shoreditch, London, May 23, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Palmer said: Being as I am the least sporty person that's probably ever existed, I can't honestly say that I'm excited about it. I think the money could go towards better things. Picture taken May 23, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Sharon Edgar, a 37 year-old personal trainer who has lived in London for twelve years, poses for a picture in Wandsworth Common, London, May 24, 2012. When asked what she felt about London hosting the Olympics, Edgar said: It's very exciting, a real challenge for the city. I'm glad it's happening when I'm alive. Picture taken May 24, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Fred Bayles, a 66 year-old butcher who has lived all his life in London, poses for a picture in Battersea, London, May 24, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, Edgar said: I think it just puts everybody out of sync. People can't go to work and can't go home. It's a white elephant because when it's finished what are we going to do with all the debts? Picture taken May 24, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

London 2012: Oh To Be A Londoner

Ben White, a 38 year-old director of tennis who has lived in London for seventeen years, poses for a picture in Wandsworth, London, May 24, 2012. When asked what he felt about London hosting the Olympics, White said: It's a good thing. It should inspire more people into sport. I'm slightly sceptical about how corporate it is and how much things will really change. Picture taken May 24, 2012. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth