The poaching of wild and exotic animals used to be a big problem in the 70′s and 80′s and even into the 90′s. You’d think that with all the free information available to just about every human being on the planet in 2012, we had grown a little wiser since then, but we haven’t. Every year thousands of elephants, tigers, rhinos and other wild animals are poached for their hides, horns or other body parts, because some guy in China thinks it will give him a bigger manhood. Simply shameful.
Warning: Some images are disturbing

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The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A member of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stands guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A member of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stands guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A pair of elephants walk through scrub in the dusk light in Pilanesberg National Park in South Africa's North West Province April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A White Rhino and her calf walk in the dusk light in Pilanesberg National Park in South Africa's North West Province April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012.REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

Members of the Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) patrol in Pilanesberg National Park April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A member of the Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) patrols in Pilanesberg National Park April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

The carcasses of some of the 22 elephant slaughtered in a helicopter-bourne attack lie on the ground in the Democratic Republic of Congo's Garamba National Park, in this undated handout picture released by the DRC Military. A record number of big ivory seizures were made globally in 2011 and the trend looks set to continue in 2012 as elephant massacres take place from Congo to Cameroon, where as many as 200 of the pachyderms, listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as vulnerable, were slain in January. REUTERS/DRC Military/Handout

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

Members of the Pilanesberg National Park Anti-Poaching Unit (APU) stand guard as conservationists and police investigate the scene of a rhino poaching incident April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

An elephant walks through scrub in the dusk light in Pilanesberg National Park in South Africa's North West Province April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A White Rhino walks through scrub in the dusk light in Pilanesberg National Park in South Africa's North West Province April 19, 2012. Elephant and rhino poaching is surging, conservationists say, an illegal piece of Asia's scramble for African resources, driven by the growing purchasing power of the region's newly affluent classes. In South Africa, nearly two rhinos a day are being killed to meet demand for the animal's horn, which is worth more than its weight in gold. Picture taken April 19, 2012. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A warden stands guard as an illegal consignment of five tonnes of Ivory confiscated from smugglers is destroyed during the African Elephant Law Enforcement Day in Tsavo West National Park, 380 km (236 miles) east of capital Nairobi July 20, 2011. The confiscated consignment, recovered from smugglers in Singapore in 2002, originated from poaching activities in both Zambia and Malawi, government officials said. REUTERS/Noor Khamis

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A rhino is dehorned by a veterinary surgeon and rangers to prevent poaching at the Kruger national park in Mpumalanga province September 16, 2011. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis. Picture taken September 16, 2011. REUTERS/Ilya Kachaev

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A ranger shows part of a rhino horn after a rhino was dehorned by a veterinary surgeon to prevent poaching at the Kruger national park in Mpumalanga province September 16, 2011. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis. Picture taken September 16, 2011. REUTERS/Ilya Kachaev

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

The carcass of a rhino is seen after it was killed for its horn by poachers at the Kruger national park in Mpumalanga province September 14, 2011. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis. Picture taken September 14, 2011. REUTERS/Ilya Kachaev

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

A Kenya Wildlife Services ranger guards a shipment of elephant tusks during a commemoration of the 1989 ivory burning at the Nairobi National Park July 18, 2009. In 1989 tons of ivory were torched by then president Daniel Arap Moi in an effort to combat elephant and rhino poaching. Kenya remains opposed to the lifting of the international ivory trade ban. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

The Poaching Problem Of Africa

Policeman look on as a protester carries a placard calling for an end to rhino poaching, which threatens the survival of rhino species, outside the Chinese embassy in Pretoria September 22, 2011. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko