I have no clue about the science behind solar flares and their effect on our little planet, but when I see cool pictures of the sun I just have to post them.

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Solar Flares

The sun erupts with one of the largest solar flares of this solar cycle in this NASA handout photo taken on March 6, 2012. This flare was categorized as an X5.4, making it the second largest flare -- after an X6.9 on August 9, 2011 -- since the sun's activity segued into a period of relatively low activity called solar minimum in early 2007. The current increase in the number of X-class flares is part of the sun's normal 11-year solar cycle, during which activity on the sun ramps up to solar maximum, which is expected to peak in late 2013. REUTERS/NASA/SD0/AIA/Handout

Solar Flares

The sun erupts with one of the largest solar flares of this solar cycle in this multi-colored NASA handout photo taken on March 6, 2012. This flare was categorized as an X5.4, making it the second largest flare -- after an X6.9 on August 9, 2011 -- since the sun's activity segued into a period of relatively low activity called solar minimum in early 2007. The current increase in the number of X-class flares is part of the sun's normal 11-year solar cycle, during which activity on the sun ramps up to solar maximum, which is expected to peak in late 2013. REUTERS/NASA/SD0/AIA/Handout

Solar Flares

NASA handout image shows the Sun acquired by the Solar Dynamics Observatory on March 8, 2012. A strong geomagnetic storm is racing from the Sun toward Earth, and its expected arrival on Thursday could affect power grids, airplane routes and space-based satellite navigation systems, U.S. space weather experts said. REUTERS/SDO/NASA/Handout

Solar Flares

NOAA handout image shows the Sun's activity on March 8, 2012. A strong geomagnetic storm is racing from the Sun toward Earth, and its expected arrival on Thursday could affect power grids, airplane routes and space-based satellite navigation systems, U.S. space weather experts said. REUTERS/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Handout

Solar Flares

The sun sets into the Pacific Ocean off Oceanside, California, March 14, 2011. REUTERS/Mike Blake

Solar Flares

A handout picture shows Coronal Mass Ejection as viewed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory on June 7, 2011. The Sun unleashed an M-2 (medium-sized) solar flare, an S1-class (minor) radiation storm and a spectacular coronal mass ejection (CME) on June 7, 2011 from sunspot complex 1226-1227. The large cloud of particles mushroomed up and fell back down looking as if it covered an area of almost half the solar surface. The sun is entering a more active phase due to peak in 2013 on a roughly 11-year sunspot cycle, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said. Power supplies, air traffic control, communications and satellites can all be disrupted by storms. Picture taken June 7, 2011. REUTERS/NASA/SDO/Handout

Solar Flares

A fisherman casts his line as the sun sets on the outskirts of Havana July 25, 2011. REUTERS/Desmond Boylan

Solar Flares

Solar activity is shown in an image made by NASA's SOHO Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument at 6:30 a.m. (1130 GMT) on
October 28, 2003. The cloud, known to astronomers as a coronal mass ejection, is the one of the strongest ever detected since scientists started measuring these phenomena a quarter-century ago. When that cloud of particles gets here, perhaps by midday Wednesday, it could have severe effects, such as affecting some modern electronics and navigation equipment. REUTERS/Nasa/ESA Soho

Solar Flares

Solar activity is shown in an image made by NASA's SOHO Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument at 6:30 a.m. (1130 GMT) on
October 28, 2003. The cloud, known to astronomers as a coronal mass ejection, is the one of the strongest ever detected since scientists started measuring these phenomena a quarter-century ago. When that
cloud of particles gets here, perhaps by midday Wednesday, it could have severe effects, such as affecting some modern electronics and navigation equipment. REUTERS/Nasa/ESA Soho

Solar Flares

A plane flies past a setting sun near the Songshan airport in Taipei July 20, 2009. REUTERS/Nicky Loh

Solar Flares

Aurora Australis, or the Southern Lights, glow in the sky over the town of Glenn Ourua near Palmeston North, north of New Zealand's national capital Wellington on April 1, 2001, in the area's most dramatic display since 1989. Auroral activity results from atomic particles spiralling into the earth's north and south polar atmosphere along magnetic field lines and then colliding with atmospheric molecules, resulting in the emission of energy in different forms including light. Four solar flares and a pair of powerful magnetic gas clouds spawned in a monster sunspot are believed to have produced this dazzling display. REUTERS/Stringer

Solar Flares

Photograph taken by George Simnet, a solar physicist at the University of Birmingham and released March 4 by Britain's Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), shows the Sun sneezing a huge bubble of hydrogen gas, as seen by the SOHO explorer, a joint NASA-European Space Agency project. A similar flare knocked out AT&T's Telstar 401 television relay satellite on January 11, ruining viewing for millions of people.

Solar Flares

An antenna for space communication is seen at sunrise at Baikonur cosmodrome May 25, 2009. The crew of Russian cosmonaut Roman Romanenko, Canadian astronaut Robert Thirsk and European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Frank De Winne of Belgium is scheduled to take off to the International Space Station (ISS) on May 27. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov

Solar Flares

This image of the sun, captured by The Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft January 28, 2011, shows nearly simultaneous solar eruptions on opposite sides of the Sun, in this photograph released by NASA January 28. A filament on the left side became unstable and erupted, while an M-1 flare and a coronal mass ejection on the right blasted into space. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

Mar 09, 2012