These are images of the poppy eradication efforts in Myanmar’s impoverished Shan State. In Myanmar’s new war on drugs, meet the weapon of mass destruction: the weed-whacker. The saying Opium For The People has never been truer.

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The MyanMar War On Opium

A policeman secures a temple where local villagers meet UN representatives and Myanmar police in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Ethnic Akha people talk to a policeman as villagers meet UN and Myanmar's police representatives in the village of Kor Miang Pin in mountains of Shan State January 29, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Abo, a long time opium addict, passes time at a drugs treatment hospital in Keng Tung, in the mountains of Shan State, January 28, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Abo, a long time opium addict, passes time at a drugs treatment hospital in Keng Tung, in the mountains of Shan State, January 28, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Abo, a long time opium addict, sits in a drugs treatment hospital in Keng Tung in mountains of Shan State January 28, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Moe Mohm, 48, an ethnic Pa-O widow with six daughters whose poppy field was destroyed, stands outside her house in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Moe Mohm, 48, an ethnic Pa-O widow with six daughters whose poppy field was destroyed, sits in her house in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Moe Mohm, 48, an ethnic Pa-O widow with six daughters whose poppy field was destroyed, sits in her house in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Moe Mohm, 48, an ethnic Pa-O widow with six daughters whose poppy field was destroyed, sits in her house in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Jason Eligh (C) of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and other representatives meet farmers in the village of War Taw, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

A policeman holds poppy plants after a field was destroyed above the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Ethnic Akha people wearing traditional clothes meet UN representatives and Myanmar police in the village of Kor Miang Pin, in the mountains of Shan State January 29, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Policemen destroy a poppy field above the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Villagers sit outside a house where they met UN and Myanmar's police representatives in the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Children gather in a school in the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Villagers sit outside a house where they met UNODC and Myanmar's police representatives in the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Villagers meet UN and Myanmar's police representatives in the village of War Taw, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Villagers rest after destroying poppy fields above the village of Ho Hwayt, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Novice monks play as a policeman secures a Buddhist temple where local villagers meet UN representatives and Myanmar police in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Buddhist novice monks prepare food at a temple where local villagers meet UN and Myanmar's police representatives in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Buddhist novice monks eat at a temple where local villagers meet UNODC and Myanmar's police representatives in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Novice monks play as a policeman secures a Buddhist temple where local villagers meet UNODC representatives and Myanmar police in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

A policeman uses a grass cutter to destroy a poppy field above the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

An ethnic Pa-O woman smiles after meeting UNODC and Myanmar's police representatives in the village of War Taw, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Policemen and local villagers destroy a poppy field above the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

A Buddhist novice monk stands by the window at a temple where local villagers meet UN and Myanmar's police representatives in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

A policeman secures a Buddhist temple where local villagers meet UNODC representatives and Myanmar police in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Buddhist novice monks prepare food at a temple where local villagers meet UNODC and Myanmar's police representatives in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

A policeman secures a temple where local villagers meet UN representatives and Myanmar police in the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

An ethnic Akha child wearing traditional clothes is seen as villagers meet representatives of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and Myanmar's police at the village of Kor Miang Pin, in the mountains of Shan State January 29, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 29, 2012.
REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Villagers walk home after destroying poppy fields above the village of Ho Hwayt, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Villagers walk home after destroying poppy fields above the village of Ho Hwayt, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Ethnic Akha women wearing traditional clothes meet representatives of the United Nations Office on Drug and Crime (UNODC) and Myanmar's police at the village of Kor Miang Pin, in the mountains of Shan State January 29, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 29, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Ethnic Akha women wearing traditional clothes meet representatives of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and Myanmar's police at the village of Kor Miang Pin, in the mountains of Shan State January 29, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 29, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Buddhist novice monks gather outside a temple where local villagers meet representatives of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and Myanmar's police at the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

A policeman holds poppy plants after a field was destroyed above the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need.
REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Soldiers use sticks to destroy poppy fields above the village of Ho Hwayt, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Soldiers and villagers walk home after destroying the poppy fields above the village of Ho Hwayt, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Villagers sit outside a house where they met UN and Myanmar's police representatives at the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 27, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Policemen and villagers use sticks and grass cutters to destroy a poppy field above the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 27, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Poppy plants are seen after policemen destroyed a field above the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 27, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Ethnic Pa-O woman holds her baby as local villagers meet with representatives of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and Myanmar's police at the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

An ethnic Pa-O man takes a bath after meeting with representatives of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and Myanmar's police at the village of War Taw, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 27, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Policemen patrol near the village of Kyauk Ka Char, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Representatives of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and Myanmar's police visited the village only a few weeks after fighting between local ethnic groups stopped. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 27, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

The hands of 48-year-old Moe Mohm, an ethnic Pa-O widow with six daughters, whose poppy field was destroyed, are seen at the village of Kyauk Ka Char in the mountains of Shan State January 26, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 26, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

The MyanMar War On Opium

Policemen and local villagers destroy a poppy field above the village of Tar-Pu, in the mountains of Shan State January 27, 2012. Myanmar has dramatically escalated its poppy eradication efforts since September 2011, threatening the livelihoods of impoverished farmers who depend upon opium as a cash crop to buy food. With new ceasefires ending years of conflict between the government and ethnic insurgents, Myanmar police and United Nations officials are travelling through opium-rich Shan State to ask farmers what assistance they need. Picture taken January 27, 2012. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj