There’s a nasty rumor going around. We’re accusing the Chinese of simply copying all usefull and great inventions and mass producing these as inferior products, but theses images show us doubters that the Chinese do indeed invent stuff themselves. They just haven’t caught on yet.

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Crazy Chinese Inventions

Li Yuming, a local farmer who is interested in scientific invention, works on his unfinished miniature submarine Xiaguang V on the outskirts of Wuhan, capital of central China's Hubei province August 24, 2007. Xiaguang V, which is 3-metre long, 1.2-metre in height, has a maximum diving depth of 20 metres, and can hold two adults and one child at the same time. The submarine will be used for tour after safety test, local media said. Picture taken August 24, 2007. REUTERS/Stringer

Crazy Chinese Inventions

A child rides a specially constructed ice-chair on the frozen Houhai Lake in Beijing January 15, 2008. Weather bureau forecasts freezing temperature reaching a low of -10°C (14°F) in the Chinese capital. REUTERS/Claro Cortes IV

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Farmer Wu Yulu, 48, rides in a cart pulled by his walking robot near his home in a village at the outskirts of Beijing April 14, 2010. Hobby inventor Wu, who started to build robots in 1986, has invented 47 robots with different functions like jump, paint, drink, pull cart, massage, and help cooking. He will display more than 30 his robots during Shanghai World Expo 2010, and he wants to promote his practical robots into market by the Expo. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Chinese farmer Yang Youde pushes his homemade cannon near his farmland on the outskirts of Wuhan, Hubei province June 6, 2010. Yang's cannon, which is made out of a wheelbarrow, pipes and firing rockets, is used to defend his fields against property developers who wants his land. Picture taken June 6, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Chinese farmer Yang Youde fires his homemade cannon near his farmland on the outskirts of Wuhan, Hubei province June 6, 2010. Yang's cannon, which is made out of a wheelbarrow, pipes and firing rockets, is used to defend his fields against property developers who wants his land. Picture taken June 6, 2010. REUTERS/Stringer

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Gao Hanjie installs the rotor blades on his homemade helicopter in Shenyang, Liaoning province June 9, 2010. The graphic designer and helicopter enthusiast, with help from his friends, has spent more than a month building the 6-meter-long and 350kg helicopter. Gao claims he will eventually fly the contraption as a personal project according to local media. REUTERS/Sheng Li

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Lei Zhiqian rides a modified bicycle across the Hanjiang River, a tributary of the Yangtze River in Wuhan, Hubei province June 16, 2010. The bicycle, equipped with eight empty water containers at the bottom, was modified by Lei's instructor Li Weiguo, who hopes to put his invention into the market. Picture taken June 16, 2010. REUTERS/China Daily

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Ding Shilu, an automobile mechanic, sits in his self-made aircraft to prepare a test-flight at a frozen reservoir in Shenyang, Liaoning province February 25, 2011. The aircraft which weights about 130 kg (287 lbs) and made of recycled materials including three motorbike engines and plastic cloth, cost about 2600 yuan ($395), local media reported. REUTERS/Stringer

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Ding Shilu, an automobile mechanic, carries out a test-flight for his self-made aircraft at a frozen reservoir in Shenyang, Liaoning province February 25, 2011. The aircraft which weights about 130 kg (287 lbs) and made of recycled materials including three motorbike engines and plastic cloth, cost about 2600 yuan ($395), local media reported. REUTERS/Stringer

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Zhang Yali, 49, tests a giant bicycle designed and made by him and his friends outside a rented warehouse in Jilin, Jilin province December 25, 2011. The 3.2-metre-high and 5.5-metre-long three-seated giant bicycle, weighing over one tonne, cost Zhang more over 20,000 yuan (3,156 USD). Zhang spent two months making this bike as a gift for his son, a 25-year-old part-time cartoonist currently living in Shenzhen, Guangdong province. According to Zhang's family, they were planning to ride this bike from Jilin to Shenzhen, local media reported. Picture taken December 25, 2011. REUTERS/China Daily

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Zhang Yali, 49, tests a giant bicycle designed and made by him and his friends outside a rented warehouse in Jilin, Jilin province December 25, 2011. The 3.2-metre-high and 5.5-metre-long three-seated giant bicycle, weighing over one tonne, cost Zhang more over 20,000 yuan (3,156 USD). Zhang spent two months making this bike as a gift for his son, a 25-year-old part-time cartoonist currently living in Shenzhen, Guangdong province. According to Zhang's family, they were planning to ride this bike from Jilin to Shenzhen, local media reported. Picture taken December 25, 2011. REUTERS/China Daily

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Farmer Wu Yulu drives his rickshaw pulled by a his self-made walking robot near his home in a village at the outskirts of Beijing January 8, 2009. This robot is the latest and largest development of hobby inventor Wu, who started to build robots in 1986, made of wire, metal, screws and nails found in rubbish sites. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause

Crazy Chinese Inventions

A self-styled Chinese inventor tests his homemade helicoptor next to his apartment in Beijing June 25, 2003. Yu Jun follows in the footsteps
of his younger brother who lost his life in a national park in central China at the end of a 20 year search for the legendary Bigfoot, and intends to continue the quest from the sky. Without any formal
education in aerospace science, Yu Jun spent five years constructing the helicopter from spare parts belonging to a dilapidated Lada automobile (in back). REUTERS/China Photo

Crazy Chinese Inventions

A woman rides an unicycle at a park in Shanghai February 28, 2004. The unicycle was designed several years ago by Chinese inventor Li Yongli who called it the number one vehicle in the world. REUTERS/China Photos

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Tao Xiangli stands beside his homemade submarine in a courtyard in Beijing July 10, 2008. The amateur inventor says his submarine is made from old oil barrels but fully functional with a periscope, depth control tanks, electric motors and two propellers. Tao plans to test it soon. REUTERS/Reinhard Krause

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Chinese passers-by are surprised to see self-styled Chinese inventor Li Yongli's latest unicycle on a Beijing street April 2. Li rode the prototype around the Chinese capital on Sunday in order to attract investments to commercialise his design which he called The number one car in the world.

Crazy Chinese Inventions

Han Yuzi, 63, inventor, holds up one of his creations, a hair comb that doubles as a small hand-held musical instrument, in Guangzhou, the capital of China's Guangdong province, September 13, 2003. The instrument measures 126.2 mm in length, 48.6 mm in width and weighs 68 grams.

Dec 28, 2011