The Faroe Islands are not famous for many things, but every year around the end of November they get some press. Bad press. It is in this time that they have their annual Grindadrap or whale hunt in English. Each year they kill (and eat) hundreds of pilot whales by driving them into a bay and killing them. The whale meat is distributed equally amongst the families and can’t be sold. It looks bad and it could probably be done more humanly, but is it any worse than we treat our chickens, cows, pigs and sheep? Warning: graphic content

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Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Inhabitants of Faroe Islands catch to slaughter pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) during the traditional Grindadrap (whale hunting in Faroese) near the capital Torshavn, November 22, 2011. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. Grindadrap whaling is not done for commercial purposes, the meat can not be sold and is divided evenly between members of the local community. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Inhabitants of Faroe Islands slaughter pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) during the traditional Grindadrap (whale hunting in Faroese) near the capital Torshavn, November 22, 2011. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. Grindadrap whaling is not done for commercial purposes, the meat can not be sold and is divided evenly between members of the local community. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Inhabitants of Faroe Islands slaughter pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) during the traditional Grindadrap (whale hunting in Faroese) near the capital Torshavn, November 22, 2011. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. Grindadrap whaling is not done for commercial purposes, the meat can not be sold and is divided evenly between members of the local community. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Inhabitants of Faroe Islands catch and slaughter pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) during the traditional Grindadrap (whale hunting in Faroese) near the capital Torshavn, November 22, 2011. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. Grindadrap whaling is not done for commercial purposes, the meat can not be sold and is divided evenly between members of the local community. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Inhabitants of Faroe Islands catch and slaughter pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) during the traditional Grindadrap (whale hunting in Faroese) near the capital Torshavn, November 22, 2011. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. Grindadrap whaling is not done for commercial purposes, the meat can not be sold and is divided evenly between members of the local community. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Inhabitants of Faroe Islands catch and slaughter pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) during the traditional Grindadrap (whale hunting in Faroese) near the capital Torshavn, November 22, 2011. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. Grindadrap whaling is not done for commercial purposes, the meat can not be sold and is divided evenly between members of the local community. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

A Faroese man shows his son how to take out teeth from a whale's jaw in the harbour of Torshavn, July 23, 2010. Every year, herds of pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) are passing by shores of Faroe Islands, small North Atlantic archipelago, an autonomous province of Denmark. In the past fishermen used spears and harpoons, but today the whale hunting equipment is legally restricted to special knives, ropes, and assessing-poles for measurement. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

More than 120 pilot whales, slaughtered July 23, 2010, are pictured in the harbor of Torshavn Every year, herds of pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) are passing by shores of Faroe Islands, small North Atlantic archipelago, an autonomous province of Denmark. In the past fishermen used spears and harpoons, but today the whale hunting equipment is legally restricted to special knives, ropes, and assessing-poles for measurement. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

A boy stands next to a slaughtered whale in the town of Syorugota, Faroe Islands early May 28, 2011. The slaughter of pilot whales is a cultural tradition held annually in the Faroe Islands where whales were once an important food source. A record number of 220 pilot whales were killed early Saturday. The meat of the whales are distributed among the community and not sold for profit. REUTERS/Palma Jakcobsen

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

A fork-lift carries a slaughtered whale in the town of Syorugota, Faroe Islands early May 28, 2011. The slaughter of pilot whales is a cultural tradition held annually in the Faroe Islands where whales were once an important food source. A record number of 220 pilot whales were killed early Saturday. The meat of the whales are distributed among the community and not sold for profit. REUTERS/Palma Jakcobsen

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

A crane carries a slaughtered whale in the town of Syorugota, Faroe Islands early May 28, 2011. The slaughter of pilot whales is a cultural tradition held annually in the Faroe Islands where whales were once an important food source. A record number of 220 pilot whales were killed early Saturday. The meat of the whales are distributed among the community and not sold for profit. REUTERS/Palma Jakcobsen

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

A slaughtered whale is pictured in the town of Hvalvik, May 23, 2009. More than 180 pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) were killed in the small town of Hvalvik during the traditional whale killing In Faroe Islands. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. The Faroese aren?t involved in commercial whaling, they don't sell the meat, instead it is divided evenly to the local community. Picture taken May 23, 2009. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Whales are pictured in a bay near the town of Hvalvik, May 23, 2009. More than 180 pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) were killed in the small town of Hvalvik during the traditional whale killing In Faroe Islands. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. The Faroese aren?t involved in commercial whaling, they don't sell the meat, instead it is divided evenly to the local community. Picture taken May 23, 2009. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

A man cuts a slaughtered whale in the town of Hvalvik, May 23, 2009. More than 180 pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) were killed in the small town of Hvalvik during the traditional whale killing In Faroe Islands. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. The Faroese aren?t involved in commercial whaling, they don't sell the meat, instead it is divided evenly to the local community. Picture taken May 23, 2009. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Local residents catch whales to slaughter them near the town of Hvalvik, May 23, 2009. More than 180 pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) were killed in the small town of Hvalvik during the traditional whale killing In Faroe Islands. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. The Faroese aren?t involved in commercial whaling, they don't sell the meat, instead it is divided evenly to the local community. Picture taken May 23, 2009. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Local residents catch and slaughter whales near the town of Hvalvik, May 23, 2009. More than 180 pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) were killed in the small town of Hvalvik during the traditional whale killing In Faroe Islands. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. The Faroese aren?t involved in commercial whaling, they don't sell the meat, instead it is divided evenly to the local community. Picture taken May 23, 2009. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Local residents catch whales to slaughter them near the town of Hvalvik, May 23, 2009. More than 180 pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) were killed in the small town of Hvalvik during the traditional whale killing In Faroe Islands. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. The Faroese aren?t involved in commercial whaling, they don't sell the meat, instead it is divided evenly to the local community. Picture taken May 23, 2009. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

People watch as local residents catch whales to slaughter them in a bay near the town of Hvalvik, May 23, 2009. More than 180 pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) were killed in the small town of Hvalvik during the traditional whale killing In Faroe Islands. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. The Faroese aren?t involved in commercial whaling, they don't sell the meat, instead it is divided evenly to the local community. Picture taken May 23, 2009. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic

Whale Hunting In The Faroe Islands

Slaughtered whales are pictured in the town of Hvalvik, May 23, 2009. More than 180 pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) were killed in the small town of Hvalvik during the traditional whale killing In Faroe Islands. Residents of the Faroe Islands, an autonomous province of Denmark, slaughter and eat pilot whales every year. The Faroese are descendents of Vikings, and pilot whales have been a central part of their diet for more than 1,000 years. They crowd the animals into a bay and kill them. The Faroese aren?t involved in commercial whaling, they don't sell the meat, instead it is divided evenly to the local community. Picture taken May 23, 2009. REUTERS/Andrija Ilic