The waters in the Mississippi river in the heartland of America have still not subsided. Thousands of homes have been flooded and thousands of people have had to grab what they could and evacuate the place they call home.

The Mississippi Floods Update

Water from the swollen Mississippi River surrounds the Historic Yazoo & Mississippi Valley Railroad Company Depot in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 10, 2011. More residents were warned on Monday to get out of the way of the raging Mississippi River as it surged toward a near-record crest in its southern reaches, prompting authorities to try to divert some of the flood waters. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

Wheat is partially submerged in floodwaters in Holly Grove, Arkansas May 10, 2011. The Mississippi River may have reached its highest level at Memphis early on Tuesday just inches below the all-time record, according to the National Weather Service, as a wall of water moved south toward the Gulf of Mexico. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Members of the Vicksburg Fire Department and county crews head out on a boat, past a partially submerged building, as they prepare to sandbag areas on the levee to slow down floodwaters from the swollen Mississippi River in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 11, 2011. Heavy flooding in the U.S. Midwest shut Ohio River terminals, limited barge movements and threatened to disrupt refinery operations along the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

Flood water inundate the Chickasaw subdivision as water from the rising Mississippi River engulfs homes in low lying areas in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 11, 2011. The swollen Mississippi River set a record high-water level at Natchez, Mississippi, on Wednesday -- 10 days before its expected crest in the southern city. Residents were bracing for expected record crests at Vicksburg on May 19 and Natchez on May 21. Up to 5,000 Mississippi residents may be forced to evacuate, authorities said. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

Peyton Creech walks in water in front of his grandmother Jo McDaniel's home near a rising Yazoo River, a tributary of the Mississippi, in Satartia, Mississippi May 11, 2011. The swollen Mississippi River set a record high-water level at Natchez, Mississippi, on Wednesday -- 10 days before its expected crest in the southern city. The flood, the result of a wet spring and huge snow melt from an unusually stormy winter, has caused evacuations of thousands of people along the river and its tributaries, swamping river towns and as many as 3 million acres of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas alone. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Frank Rankin stands in front of his flooded home along Chickasaw Road, which has been surrounded by water from the swelling Mississippi River in Vicksburg, Mississippi on May 11, 2011. The swollen Mississippi River set a record high-water level at Natchez, Mississippi, on Wednesday -- 10 days before its expected crest in the southern city. The flood, the result of a wet spring and huge snow melt from an unusually stormy winter, has caused evacuations of thousands of people along the river and its tributaries, swamping river towns and as many as 3 million acres of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas alone. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

A construction worker moves dirt using a compact track loader to shore up a levee near Vidalia, Louisiana May 12, 2011. The government scrambled to shore up the levee system in the Deep South on Thursday to prevent the Mississippi River from overflowing and flooding populated areas and is determining whether to open the Morganza Spillway in Louisiana this weekend to prevent massive flooding in New Orleans and other parts of Louisiana. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

A sign is seen in Waterproof, Louisiana May 12, 2011. The U.S. government scrambled to shore up the levee system in the Deep South on Thursday to prevent the mighty Mississippi River from overflowing and flooding populated areas. The Mississippi River flood, the result of a wet spring and huge snow melt from an unusually stormy winter, has forced the evacuation of thousands of people along the river and its tributaries, swamping river towns and expected to flood 3 million acres of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas alone. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Homes are seen nearly submerged by floodwaters in Deer Park, Louisiana May 12, 2011. The U.S. government scrambled to shore up the levee system in the Deep South on Thursday to prevent the mighty Mississippi River from overflowing and flooding populated areas. The Mississippi River flood, the result of a wet spring and huge snow melt from an unusually stormy winter, has forced the evacuation of thousands of people along the river and its tributaries, swamping river towns and expected to flood 3 million acres of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas alone. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Three members of the Shelby County Sheriff's Office's Emergency Services patrol a flooded mobile home park, evacuated last week, in Memphis, Tennessee, May 12, 2011. The U.S. government scrambled to shore up the levee system in the Deep South on Thursday to prevent the mighty Mississippi River from overflowing and flooding populated areas. The Mississippi River flood, the result of a wet spring and huge snow melt from an unusually stormy winter, has forced the evacuation of thousands of people along the river and its tributaries, swamping river towns and expected to flood 3 million acres of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas alone. REUTERS/John Branston

The Mississippi Floods Update

A sign is seen along a levee near the Ameristar Casino in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 13, 2011. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

The Morganza Spillway is seen in Morganza, Louisiana May 14, 2011. Authorities will start opening the key spillway Saturday afternoon to relieve the swollen Mississippi River and avoid flooding Louisiana's two largest cities although potentially swamping thousands of homes and acres of crops. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Workers with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers await orders to open on the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, Louisiana May 14, 2011. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to open one bay of the spillway today in order to relieve pressure of the the levees along the Mississippi River. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

A flood gauge sits in the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, Louisiana May 14, 2011. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to open one bay of the spillway today in order to relieve pressure of the the levees along the Mississippi River. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

A flood impacted area of the Mississippi River is pictured from the International Space Station in this image taken May 12, 2011, shows the areas of Ruckers Place, Tenn. and Tomato, Ark. surrounded by water, while Barfield, Ark. remains dry behind the levee on the right side of the image. Authorities will start opening a key spillway by early Saturday evening to relieve the swollen Mississippi River and avoid flooding Louisiana's two largest cities although potentially swamping thousands of homes and acres of crops. REUTERS/NASA/Handout

The Mississippi Floods Update

Members with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers open the Morganza Spillway in Morganza, Louisiana May 14, 2011. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

Residents move a boat filled with mattresses in Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 14, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Residents move their possession from Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 14, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

A man looks at rising floodwaters from a levee in Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 14, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Phyllis Boudreaux renames the camp of her friend Beanie Hendrick threatened by floodwaters in Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 14, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Residents gather at Doucet's Grocery in Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

A resident evacuates with belongings in Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

A sign is seen on a tree in Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Inmates from Breaux Bridge, Louisiana make sand bags for residents in Stephensville, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

Amber Colbert, 15, lifts a sandbag up as she and her family prepare for rising flood waters due to the opening of the Morganza Spillway in Stephensville, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

David Leonard, 16, helps carry sandbags through a backyard of a house as water from the Morganza Spillway is expected to threaten the home in Stephensville, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

Inmates from Breaux Bridge, Louisiana make sand bags for residents in Stephensville, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

A resident holds a crucifix and a moving strap as floodwaters approach Krotz Springs, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Kimberly Reed and her daughter Emily move their possessions from their home as floodwaters approach Krotz Springs, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

William Reed ties down a refrigerator while moving possessions from his home as floodwaters approach Krotz Springs, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Residents move their possessions as floodwaters approach Krotz Springs, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Emily Reed stands near a trailer carrying her family's possessions as floodwaters approach Krotz Springs, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

People look out at the Atchafalaya River as floodwaters approach Melville, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

A man sits at the edge of the Atchafalaya River as floodwaters approach Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

A National Guard troop stands guard on a levee as floodwaters approach Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Army engineers on Saturday opened a key spillway to allow the swollen Mississippi River to flood thousands of homes and crops but spare New Orleans and Louisiana's capital Baton Rouge. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Brittany Pearce (R) stands atop a mound of sandbags in front of her grandparents' house in Stephensville, Louisiana May 15, 2011. A day after Army engineers opened a key spillway to relieve flooding along the Mississippi River, residents of small Louisiana towns braced on Sunday for a surge of water that could leave thousands of homes and farms under as much as 20 feet of water. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

Family members throw sandbags in front of the Guillory family home as they prepare for threatening floodwaters due to the opening of the Morganza Spillway in Stephensville, Louisiana May 15, 2011. A day after Army engineers opened a key spillway to relieve flooding along the Mississippi River, residents of small Louisiana towns braced on Sunday for a surge of water that could leave thousands of homes and farms under as much as 20 feet of water. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

Elise Clair, 8, plays with blades of grass atop a sandbag levee in Pierre Part, Louisiana May 15, 2011. A day after Army engineers opened a key spillway to relieve flooding along the Mississippi River, residents of small Louisiana towns braced on Sunday for a surge of water that could leave thousands of homes and farms under as much as 20 feet of water. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

A woman ties sandbags together as people throughout the region race to protect their homes from rising floodwaters due to the opening of the Morganza Spillway in Stephensville, Louisiana May 15, 2011. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

Tommy Choate stands next to Jim Zowakowski as he displays his machete used to protect his brother in laws home from looters in Butte LaRose, Louisiana May 16, 2011. Residents of the Atchafalaya Basin have been forced to seek higher grounds due to rising flood waters associated with the opening of the Morganza spillway. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

The Mississippi Floods Update

A resident displays an evacuation notice as floodwaters approach Krotz Springs, Louisiana May 16, 2011. Waters unleashed by the opening of a key Mississippi River floodway crept through the Louisiana bayou on Monday in a surge that could leave thousands of homes and farms under as much as 20 feet (six metres) of water. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Military personnel examine a spot where water was seeping into a field near a levee as floodwaters approach Melville, Louisiana May 16, 2011. Waters unleashed by the opening of a key Mississippi River floodway crept through the Louisiana bayou on Monday in a surge that could leave thousands of homes and farms under as much as 20 feet of water. REUTERS/Eric Thayer (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT MILITARY)

The Mississippi Floods Update

An evacuated home is surrounded by floodwaters in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 17, 2011. The Mississippi, swollen by a rainy spring and melt from an especially snowy winter, has inundated homes and farmland across Missouri, Tennessee, Arkansas, Kentucky and southern Illinois, and the river continues to rise as it moves south through Mississippi and Louisiana. Experts say the river will rise nearly another foot in Vicksburg before Thursday, when it is expected to crest at 57.5 feet -- 14.5 feet above flood level. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

People fish in floodwaters at a housing development in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 17, 2011. The Mississippi, swollen by a rainy spring and melt from an especially snowy winter, has inundated homes and farmland across Missouri, Tennessee, Arkansas, Kentucky and southern Illinois, and the river continues to rise as it moves south through Mississippi and Louisiana. Experts say the river will rise nearly another foot in Vicksburg before Thursday, when it is expected to crest at 57.5 feet -- 14.5 feet above flood level. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Floodwaters surround a playground at a housing development in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 17, 2011. Floodwater released from a key Mississippi River spillway surged through the Louisiana bayou on Tuesday, and levees protecting the state's two biggest cities held as river flows neared their peak. Weeks of heavy rains and runoff from an unusually snowy winter caused the Mississippi River to rise, flooding thousands of homes and 3 million acres (1.2 million hectares) of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas and evoking comparisons to historic floods in 1927 and 1937. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

A boat is seen in floodwaters surrounding a home in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 17, 2011. Floodwater released from a key Mississippi River spillway surged through the Louisiana bayou on Tuesday, and levees protecting the state's two biggest cities held as river flows neared their peak. Weeks of heavy rains and runoff from an unusually snowy winter caused the Mississippi River to rise, flooding thousands of homes and 3 million acres (1.2 million hectares) of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas and evoking comparisons to historic floods in 1927 and 1937. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Floodwaters surround a sign on a roadway in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 17, 2011. Floodwater released from a key Mississippi River spillway surged through the Louisiana bayou on Tuesday, and levees protecting the state's two biggest cities held as river flows neared their peak. Weeks of heavy rains and runoff from an unusually snowy winter caused the Mississippi River to rise, flooding thousands of homes and 3 million acres (1.2 million hectares) of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas and evoking comparisons to historic floods in 1927 and 1937. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Floodwaters surround the Yazoo and Mississippi Valley Railroad Company Depot in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 17, 2011. Floodwater released from a key Mississippi River spillway surged through the Louisiana bayou on Tuesday, and levees protecting the state's two biggest cities held as river flows neared their peak. Weeks of heavy rains and runoff from an unusually snowy winter has caused the Mississippi River to rise, flooding thousands of homes and three million acres (1.2 million hectares) of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas and evoking comparisons to historic floods in 1927 and 1937. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

A member of law enforcement navigates floodwaters in a neighborhood in Vicksburg, Mississippi May 17, 2011. Floodwater released from a key Mississippi River spillway surged through the Louisiana bayou on Tuesday, and levees protecting the state's two biggest cities held as river flows neared their peak. Weeks of heavy rains and runoff from an unusually snowy winter has caused the Mississippi River to rise, flooding thousands of homes and three million acres (1.2 million hectares) of farmland in Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas and evoking comparisons to historic floods in 1927 and 1937. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

The Mississippi Floods Update

Water rushes over dirt roads inside the Morganza Floodway as water from the flowing floodway heads south near Krotz Springs, Louisiana May 17, 2011. Scores of U.S. heartland rivers from the Dakotas to Ohio have flooded following a snowy winter and heavy spring rains, feeding near-record crests on the lower Mississippi River. REUTERS/Sean Gardner

May 18, 2011