A year ago it was Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull volcano which caused hundreds of thousands of travellers around the world nothing but misery went it erupted and covered large poarts of Europe’s sky with volcanic ash. Could the Grimsvotn volcano do the same. When it erupted on May 21st it quicly sent a 20km high plume of smoke and ash into the atmosphere. The 20km has been reduced to a mere 10km, but the cloud of volcanic ash is drifting towards Northern Europe and some flights have already been cancelled.

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Picture shows the growing ash plume from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, as its eruption begins May 21, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ingolfur Bruun

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Picture shows the growing ash plume from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, as its eruption begins May 21, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ingolfur Bruun

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Picture shows the growing ash plume from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, as its eruption begins May 21, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ingolfur Bruun

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Picture shows the growing ash plume from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, as its eruption begins May 21, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ingolfur Bruun

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Picture shows the growing ash plume from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, as its eruption begins May 21, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ingolfur Bruun

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Picture shows the growing ash plume from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, as its eruption begins May 21, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ingolfur Bruun

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Picture shows the growing ash plume from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, as its eruption begins May 21, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ingolfur Bruun

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A combination of pictures shows the growing ash plume from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, as its eruption begins May 21, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Ingolfur Bruun

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A car drives at highway one, immersed in darkness due to ash fallout, outside the small town of Kirkjubaejarklaustur, Reykjavik, May 22, 2011.
Iceland's most active volcano erupted on Saturday, hurling a plume of ash and smoke far into the sky, which aviation officials were closely monitoring after another volcano shut European airspace for days last year. Authorities banned flights close to the Grimsvotn volcano but an official said the eruption was not expected to affect European airline traffic at least for the next 24 hours. Kirkjubaejarklaustur was engulfed in total darkness caused by the ash within two hours. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

The sun is seen through an ash fallout at highway one, outside the small town of Kirkjubaejarklaustur, Reykjavik May 22, 2011.
Iceland's most active volcano erupted on Saturday, hurling a plume of ash and smoke far into the sky, which aviation officials were closely monitoring after another volcano shut European airspace for days last year. Authorities banned flights close to the Grimsvotn volcano but an official said the eruption was not expected to affect European airline traffic at least for the next 24 hours. Kirkjubaejarklaustur was engulfed in total darkness caused by the ash within two hours. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A farm is covered in an ash colud in Thorvaldsstadir, southeast Iceland May 22, 2011.
Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Footprints are seen on a surface of ash outside a gas station in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, Reykjavik May 22, 2011. Iceland's most active volcano erupted on Saturday, hurling a plume of ash and smoke far into the sky, which aviation officials were closely monitoring after another volcano shut European airspace for days last year. Authorities banned flights close to the Grimsvotn volcano but an official said the eruption was not expected to affect European airline traffic at least for the next 24 hours. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Tire tracks are seen on a surface of ash outside a gas station in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, Reykjavik May 22, 2011. Iceland's most active volcano erupted on Saturday, hurling a plume of ash and smoke far into the sky, which aviation officials were closely monitoring after another volcano shut European airspace for days last year. Authorities banned flights close to the Grimsvotn volcano but an official said the eruption was not expected to affect European airline traffic at least for the next 24 hours. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Smoke rise from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland May 21, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Jon Gustafsson/Helicopter.is

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Ash plume from the Grímsvotn volcano as seen on May 23, 2011 at 12:00 GMT by the MERIS instrument on board ESA's Envisat satellite. Although the image shows the plume drifting southwest, models predict that most of the ash will be blown northeast over the Arctic Ocean. REUTERS/ESA/Handout

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A NASA MODIS satellite image acquired at 05:00 UTC on May 22, 2011 shows the plume casting shadow to the west, from the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. Picture taken May 22, 2011. REUTERS/NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team/Handout

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A policeman gives directions at a roadblock at the town of Kirkjubaejarklaustur May 22, 2011. Iceland's most active volcano erupted on Saturday, hurling a plume of ash and smoke far into the sky, which aviation officials were closely monitoring after another volcano shut European airspace for days last year. Authorities banned flights close to the Grimsvotn volcano but an official said the eruption was not expected to affect European airline traffic at least for the next 24 hours. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Ash covers the surface of the ground outside a gas station in Kirkjubaejarklaustur, Reykjavik May 22, 2011.
Iceland's most active volcano erupted on Saturday, hurling a plume of ash and smoke far into the sky, which aviation officials were closely monitoring after another volcano shut European airspace for days last year. Authorities banned flights close to the Grimsvotn volcano but an official said the eruption was not expected to affect European airline traffic at least for the next 24 hours. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Icelandic Photographer Robert Reynisson covers the volcano eruption at the edge of the ash fallout zone in Reykjavik May 22, 2011.
Iceland's most active volcano erupted on Saturday, hurling a plume of ash and smoke far into the sky, which aviation officials were closely monitoring after another volcano shut European airspace for days last year. Authorities banned flights close to the Grimsvotn volcano but an official said the eruption was not expected to affect European airline traffic at least for the next 24 hours. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson (ICELAND - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT MEDIA)

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A dead bird lies on Higway One near the town of Kirkjubaejarklaustur in southeast Iceland May 22, 2011.
The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A car is seen through a cloud of ash at the Geirland farm near Kirkjubaejarklaustur May 23,, 2011. People living next to the glacier where the Grimsvotn volcano burst into life on Saturday were most affected, with ash shutting out the daylight and smothering buildings and vehicles. The outburst is the volcano's most powerful since 1873 and stronger than the Eyjafjallajokull volcano which caused trouble last year, but scientists say the type of ash being spat out is less easily dispersed and winds have so far been more favourable. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A sheep is seen at a farm during the ash fallout in Mulakot May 22, 2011
. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A farmer's son prepares to herd the farm's sheep indoors to shelter from the ash fallout in Mulakot May 22, 2011. Ash from a massive plume of smoke from an eruption of Iceland's most active volcano could spread south to parts of Europe next week, but experts on Sunday still hoped the impact on air travel would be limited. The eruption at Grimsvotn has so far hit only Iceland, which closed its international airspace. A thick cloud of ash blocked out the daylight at towns and villages at the foot of the glacier where the volcano lies and covered cars and buildings. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A plane flies past smoke plume from the eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland May 21, 2011. Airlines began cancelling flights to Britain late on Monday because of an ash cloud from an Icelandic volcano reaching its airspace, although experts expected no repeat of travel chaos from an eruption a year ago. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Olafur Sigurjonsson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A plane flies past smoke plume from the eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland May 21, 2011. Airlines began cancelling flights to Britain late on Monday because of an ash cloud from an Icelandic volcano reaching its airspace, although experts expected no repeat of travel chaos from an eruption a year ago. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Olafur Sigurjonsson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Smoke plume rises from the eruption of the Grimsvotn volcano, under the Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland May 21, 2011. Airlines began cancelling flights to Britain late on Monday because of an ash cloud from an Icelandic volcano reaching its airspace, although experts expected no repeat of travel chaos from an eruption a year ago. Picture taken May 21, 2011. REUTERS/Olafur Sigurjonsson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

Rescue worker Thorsteinn Jonsson smokes a pipe in the village of Kirkjubaejarklaustur May 24, 2011. People living next to the glacier where the Grimsvotn volcano burst into life on Saturday were most affected, with ash shutting out the daylight and smothering buildings and vehicles. An ash cloud from a volcano on Iceland shut down flights in northern Britain and elsewhere in north Europe on Tuesday and was heading to Germany, but officials expected no repeat of last year's air chaos. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

The Grimsvotn Volcano Erupts In Iceland

A farmer brings collected sheep into a barrack near the village of Kirkjubaejarklaustur May 24, 2011. People living next to the glacier where the Grimsvotn volcano burst into life on Saturday were most affected, with ash shutting out the daylight and smothering buildings and vehicles. An ash cloud from a volcano on Iceland shut down flights in northern Britain and elsewhere in north Europe on Tuesday and was heading to Germany, but officials expected no repeat of last year's air chaos. REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson (ICELAND - Tags: ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY DISASTER AGRICULTURE)

May 24, 2011