Chinese New Year – often called Chinese Lunar New Year although it actually is lunisolar – is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. Despite its winter occurrence, in China it is known as Spring Festival. 2010 was the year of the Tiger and 2011 will be the year of the Rabbit.
Other years of the Rabbit are 1915, 1927, 1939, 1951, 1963, 1975, 1987, 1999, 2011, 2023.
Some Rabbit personality traits are that although generally calm, gentle and loving, Rabbit people can be very ambitious and intuitively know how to get ahead in the world. They are good listeners, kind and sweet by nature, and are therefore often sought out as popular and trusted friends. Generally noted for their physical beauty, Rabbits like to surround themselves with beautiful things. They have a good eye for art, design and fashion, and are usually at the top of anyone’s Best Dressed list.

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

01. Performers dressed in rabbit costumes stand at a temple fair to celebrate the Lunar New Year in Beijing February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Grace Liang

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

02. A man performs Chinese kungfu at a Spring Festival Temple Fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at Longtan Park in Beijing, February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

03. A woman touches a decorative item shaped like a rabbit at a Chinese New Year flower market in Taipei February 1, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Nicky Loh

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

04. A man shops for decorations at a Chinese New Year flower market in Taipei February 1, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Nicky Loh

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

05. A Peking Opera artist performs at a temple fair to celebrate the Lunar New Year in Beijing February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Grace Liang

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

06. People hold rabbit toys while visiting a Spring Festival Temple Fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at Longtan Park in Beijing February 2, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

07. Folk artists on stilts perform at a Spring Festival Temple Fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at Longtan Park in Beijing, February 2, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Jason Lee

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

08. Participants perform lion dance during the opening ceremony of a temple fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth) in Beijing February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

09. Participants perform lion dance under red lanterns during the opening ceremony of a temple fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth) in Beijing February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

10. Dancers perform during the opening ceremony of a temple fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth) in Beijing February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

11. An actor dressed (front) as a Qing Dynasty emperor stands with other actors during a performance, adapted from an ancient Qing Dynasty ceremony where emperors prayed for good harvest and fortune, at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth) in Beijing February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

12. A participant performs an ethnic dance during the opening ceremony of a temple fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year at Ditan Park (the Temple of Earth) in Beijing February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

13. A performer dressed in a rabbit costume is seen at a temple fair to celebrate the Lunar New Year in Beijing February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Grace Liang

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

14. A boy with a toy rabbit walks at the Yuyuan Garden in downtown Shanghai February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

15. A man watches as firecrackers explode during celebrations on Chinese New Year Eve in downtown Shanghai February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

16. A girl and her father watch as fireworks explode during celebrations on Chinese New Year Eve in downtown Shanghai, February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

17. People visit the Yuyuan Gardens during Chinese New Year Eve in Shanghai February 2, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

18. Fireworks explode over Marina Bay and the Esplanade Theatres (bottom L) during a pyrotechnics show to celebrate the Lunar New Year in Singapore February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on Thursday and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Edgar Su

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

19. Spectators watch fireworks during a grand celebration to welcome the Year of the Rabbit on Chinese New Year at the Quirino Grandstand in Manila February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

20. People rush to place joss sticks at the Guan Yin temple in Singapore February 3, 2011. Worshippers gather annually at the temple on the eve of the Lunar New Year with hopes to be the first person to offer joss sticks when the clock strikes midnight. The custom is believed to bring prosperity and luck. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Nicky Loh

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

21. People rush to place joss sticks at the Guan Yin temple in Singapore February 3, 2011. Worshippers gather annually at the temple on the eve of the Lunar New Year with hopes to be the first person to offer joss sticks when the clock strikes midnight. The custom is believed to bring prosperity and luck. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Nicky Loh

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

22. People rush to place joss sticks at the Guan Yin temple in Singapore February 3, 2011. Worshippers gather annually at the temple on the eve of the Lunar New Year with hopes to be the first person to offer joss sticks when the clock strikes midnight. The custom is believed to bring prosperity and luck. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Nicky Loh

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

23. Devotees offer prayers at the Wong Tai Sin temple in Hong Kong February 2, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

24. Worshippers rush to place joss sticks during Chinese New Year at the Xingtian Temple in Taipei February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Abe Sitzer

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

25. Filipino Lion dancers perform inside a trading floor of the Philippine Stocks Exchange during Chinese New Year celebration in Manila's Makati financial district February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

26. Worshippers light incense on the first day of Chinese New Year at Wuquanshan temple in Lanzhou February 3, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Aly Song

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

27. A worshipper offers a candle on the first day of Chinese New Year at Wuquanshan temple in Lanzhou February 3, 2011. The Chinese Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Aly Song

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

28. Locals burn incense to pray for good fortune on the first day of the Chinese Lunar New Year at Yonghegong Lama Temple in Beijing February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

29. Locals burn incense to pray for good fortune on the first day of the Chinese Lunar New Year at Yonghegong Lama Temple in Beijing February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

30. Locals burn incense to pray for good fortune on the first day of the Chinese Lunar New Year at Yonghegong Lama Temple in Beijing February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

31. Worshippers pray during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Lungshan temple in Taipei February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

32. Worshippers pray during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Lungshan temple in Taipei February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

33. A child dressed in a traditional Chinese costume stands in front of lanterns at a temple fair to celebrate the Lunar New Year in Beijing February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Grace Liang (CHINA - Tags: ANNIVERSARY SOCIETY)

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

34. Children, wearing rented costumes designed in styles from the Qing Dynasty, wait for a photo session at a temple fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year in Beijing February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Grace Liang

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

35. A visitor wearing a rented traditional Chinese costume laughs during a photo session at a temple fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year in Beijing February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Grace Liang

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

36. A child, wearing a rented costume designed in a style from the Qing Dynasty, eats jelly while waiting for a photo session at a temple fair to celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year in Beijing February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Grace Liang

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

37. A man lights candles to pray for good fortune at a temple in Suining on the first day of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Sichuan province February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Stringer

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

38. A woman lights incense to pray for good fortune on the first day of the Chinese Lunar New Year at a temple in Wuhu, Anhui province February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Stringer

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

39. Performers wearing costumes pray for good fortune on the first day of the Chinese Lunar New Year, at the Yumagang temple fair on the outskirts of Zitong county, Sichuan province February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Christina Hu

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

40. Filipino-Chinese pray in a temple during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Chinatown, Binondo in metro Manila February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

41. A child touches rabbit-shaped souvenir items for sale during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Chinatown, Binondo in metro Manila February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

42. Lion dancers perform as firecrackers go off during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations in Chinatown, Binondo in metro Manila February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Romeo Ranoco

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

43. Worshippers holding incense sticks pray during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Lungshan temple in Taipei February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year begins on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Pichi Chuang

Chinese New Year: Year of the Rabbit

44. Locals light incense to pray for good fortune on the first day of the Chinese Lunar New Year at Yonghegong Lama Temple in Beijing February 3, 2011. The Lunar New Year began on February 3 and marks the start of the Year of the Rabbit, according to the Chinese zodiac. REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic