Tunisia is a country in Northern Africa. Corruption is widespread and is practised on a grande scale by the families connected to (former) president Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali. For example, any car imported into Tunisia had to pass through a company owned by the Trabelsi family. And Ben Ali’s second wife just happens to be a Trabelsi. Add massive unemployment, a faltering economy and educated people selling fruit in the streets to make ends meet and you’ve got a powder keg situation.
The regime change started when a young street vendor set himself on fire in the town of Sidi Bouzid because police confiscated his only means of providing for his family. This course of action shocked many in the Arab world, whose leaders were used to having obeying subjects. As the news spread of the young man’s action, so did the riots. Twitter, Facebook, Wikileaks and some hacking by Anonymous all added fuel to the fire that has resulted in the fleeing of Ben Ali, after 23 years of ruthless rule, the fall of government and hopefully a better future for Tunisia. They’ll have to make do without the one and a half tonnes of gold Ben Ali’s wife apparently stole from the central bank just before fleeing the country. The big question now is, which Arab nation is next? Egypt are the bookmakers favorites.

The Tunisia Revolution

01. Rioters clash with riot police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

02. A view of the site where protestors clashed with police near Sidi Bouzid in Tunis January 10, 2011. The Tunisian government on Monday ordered the indefinite closure of all schools and universities in an attempt to stamp out clashes with police which it said killed 14 civilians at the weekend. Amnesty International put the death toll at 23. Photo taken January 10, 2011. REUTERS/Stringer

The Tunisia Revolution

03. An armoured personnel carrier (APC) patrols the main square in Sidi Bouzid near the capital Tunis January 13, 2011. A combination of deploying the military on the streets and concessions to protesters may allow the authorities to contain the violence, but in the longer-term they could struggle to dominate the country in the way they have done up to now. REUTERS/Stringer

The Tunisia Revolution

04. A man walks past wreckage strewn near city hall which was damaged during recent clashes with police, on the main square in Sidi Bouzid, near the capital Tunis January 13, 2011. A combination of deploying the military on the streets and concessions to protesters may allow the authorities to contain the violence, but in the longer-term they could struggle to dominate the country in the way they have done up to now. REUTERS/Stringer

The Tunisia Revolution

05. Riot police surround a rioter during clashes at the main square in the capital Tunis January 13, 2011. At least five people suffered gunshot wounds in clashes with police in the center of Tunisia's capital, Tunis, on Wednesday in a sharp escalation of the worst unrest in the country in decades. REUTERS/Stringer

The Tunisia Revolution

06. Rescue workers and police evacuate an injured policeman during clashes with protesters at the main square in the capital Tunis January 13, 2011. A combination of deploying the military on the streets and concessions to protesters may allow the authorities to contain the violence, but in the longer-term they could struggle to dominate the country in the way they have done up to now. REUTERS/Stringer

The Tunisia Revolution

07. A protestor killed in clashes with police lies on the ground near Sidi Bouzid in Tunis January 10, 2011. The Tunisian government on Monday ordered the indefinite closure of all schools and universities in an attempt to stamp out clashes with police which it said killed 14 civilians at the weekend. Amnesty International put the death toll at 23. Photo taken January 10, 2011. REUTERS/Stringer

The Tunisia Revolution

08. A protestor killed in clashes with police lies on the ground near Sidi Bouzid in Tunis January 10, 2011. The Tunisian government on Monday ordered the indefinite closure of all schools and universities in an attempt to stamp out clashes with police which it said killed 14 civilians at the weekend. Amnesty International put the death toll at 23. Photo taken January 10, 2011. REUTERS/Stringer

The Tunisia Revolution
The Tunisia Revolution

10. Riot police stand guard outside the Interior Ministry headquarters during a protest against Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali in Tunis January 14, 2011. Protesters demanded the immediate resignation of Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali on Friday despite the veteran ruler's promise to step aside in 2014 in a bid to end the worst unrest of his rule. At least 5,000 people demonstrated outside the Interior Ministry chanting Ben Ali, leave! and Ben Ali, thank you but that's enough!, a Reuters reporter said. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi

The Tunisia Revolution

11. A rioter chants slogans as he holds a riot police shield during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

12. A rioter collects stones during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

13. A Tunisian soldier and rioters look at a rioter who lost consciousness after tear gas was released during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

14. Rioters burn a policeman's hat during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

15. Tunisian soldiers try to calm down rioters during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

16. Women run during clashes with riot police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

17. A rioter throws a tear gas canister, from the riot police, towards the riot police during clashes in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

18. A rioter runs away from tear gas during clashes with riot police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

19. Rioters clash with riot police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

20. Rioters carry rocks during clashes with riot police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

21. Protesters carry an unconscious woman during clashes with riot police in the downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

22. Tunisian soldiers try to calm down rioters during clashes with riot police in the down town of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

23. Protesters demonstrate against Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali in Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Ben Ali stepped aside on Friday after failing to quell the worst anti-government unrest in his two decades in power. As the prime minister stepped in until promised elections can be held, Ben Ali's whereabouts were unclear. Al Jazeera television said he had left the country. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

24. Protesters demonstrate against Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali in Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Ben Ali stepped aside on Friday after failing to quell the worst anti-government unrest in his two decades in power. As the prime minister stepped in until promised elections can be held, Ben Ali's whereabouts were unclear. Al Jazeera television said he had left the country. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

25. Protesters demonstrate against Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali in Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Ben Ali stepped aside on Friday after failing to quell the worst anti-government unrest in his two decades in power. As the prime minister stepped in until promised elections can be held, Ben Ali's whereabouts were unclear. Al Jazeera television said he had left the country. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

26. A protester reacts after police released teargas during clashes with riot police in the down town of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali stepped aside on Friday after failing to quell the worst anti-government unrest in his two decades in power. As the prime minister stepped in until promised elections can be held, Ben Ali's whereabouts were unclear. Al Jazeera television said he had left the country. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

27. Protesters argue with riot police in the downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali stepped aside on Friday after failing to quell the worst anti-government unrest in his two decades in power. As the prime minister stepped in until promised elections can be held, Ben Ali's whereabouts were unclear. Al Jazeera television said he had left the country. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

28. Protestors walk through tear gas during clashes with riot police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Anger in the streets over police repression and poverty swept Tunisia's veteran president, Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali, from power on Friday, sending a chill through unpopular authoritarian governments across the Arab world. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

29. A Tunisian soldier screams as he tries to calm down rioters during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

30. Rioters carry a woman crying during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

31. A protester hits a policeman during clashes with riot police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali stepped aside on Friday after failing to quell the worst anti-government unrest in his two decades in power.
As the prime minister stepped in until promised elections can be held, Ben Ali's whereabouts were unclear. Al Jazeera television said he had left the country. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

32. Tunisian army soldiers stand guard near a tank in downtown Tunis January 15, 2011. Hundreds of soldiers patrolled the streets of the Tunisian capital on Saturday where the prime minister was due to meet opposition parties to try to form a coalition after protests swept the president from power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

33. A Tunisian army tank guards the Interior Ministry in downtown Tunis January 15, 2011. Hundreds of soldiers patrolled the streets of the Tunisian capital on Saturday where the prime minister was due to meet opposition parties to try to form a coalition after protests swept the president from power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

34. A Tunisian woman, seen through a broken glass window, walks next to the swimming pool at the empty and ransacked home of Kaif Ben Ali, nephew of former President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, in the Mediterranean resort of Hammamet, about 60 km from the capital January 16, 2011. Showing their contempt for Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali's family, several hundred people filed through the home of Kaif Ben Ali, taking photographs, picking up plants as souvenirs and stripping out plumbing fixtures, two days after the president was ousted. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

35. Tunisian people visit the empty and ransacked home of Kaif Ben Ali, nephew of former President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, in the Mediterranean resort of Hammamet, about 60 km from the capital January 16, 2011. Showing their contempt for Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali's family, several hundred people filed through the home of Kaif Ben Ali, taking photographs, picking up plants as souvenirs and stripping out plumbing fixtures, two days after the president was ousted. The home was also set fire by unidentified people, according to witnesses. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

36. Tunisian people walk up a staircase at the empty and ransacked home of Kaif Ben Ali, nephew of former President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, in the Mediterranean resort of Hammamet, about 60 km from the capital January 16, 2011. Showing their contempt for Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali's family, several hundred people filed through the home of Kaif Ben Ali, taking photographs, picking up plants as souvenirs and stripping out plumbing fixtures, two days after the president was ousted. The home was also set fire by unidentified people, according to witnesses. The graffiti reads, The real land owner is Kaisi family. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

37. Riot policeman try to catch a demonstrator after police broke up a demonstration in downtown Tunis January 17, 2011. Tunisian security forces used water cannon, tear gas and fired shots in the air on Monday as demonstrators took to the streets demanding that the ruling party of the ousted president give up power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

38. A demonstrator reacts as security forces use water canons to disperse protesters in downtown Tunis January 17, 2011. Tunisian security forces used water cannon, tear gas and fired shots in the air on Monday as demonstrators took to the streets demanding that the ruling party of the ousted president give up power. REUTERS/Stringer )

The Tunisia Revolution

39. A protester chants slogan during a demonstration in downtown Tunis January 17, 2011. Tunisian security forces used water cannon, tear gas and fired shots in the air on Monday as demonstrators took to the streets demanding that the ruling party of the ousted president give up power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra (TUNISIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)

The Tunisia Revolution

40. A soldier gestures as he keeps watch for snipers on the roof in downtown Tunis January 17, 2011. Tunisian security forces used water cannon, tear gas and fired shots in the air on Monday as demonstrators took to the streets demanding that the ruling party of the ousted president give up power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

41. A lawyer chants slogan during a demonstration in downtown Tunis January 17, 2011. Tunisian security forces used water cannon, tear gas and fired shots in the air on Monday as demonstrators took to the streets demanding that the ruling party of the ousted president give up power. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

42. Members of the Army Special Brigade stand guard at the Tunisia President's office in Tunis January 17, 2011. Tunisia's Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi appointed opposition figures to a new unity government on Monday, trying to establish political stability after violent street protests brought down the president last Friday, and said the government was committed to releasing all political prisoners, and that anyone with great wealth or suspected of corruption would face investigation. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi

The Tunisia Revolution

43. Riot policemen detain a demonstrator after breaking up a demonstration in downtown Tunis January 18, 2011. Three opposition ministers quit Tunisia's new coalition government on Tuesday in protest at the presence of members of the party of ousted leader Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali. Police in Tunis repeatedly used teargas in an attempt to break up a protest by several hundred opposition party supporters and trade unionists who labelled the new government a sham. Protesters would scatter, but then regroup to continue. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

44. A protester throws a tear gas canister back at riot police after they broke up a demonstration in downtown Tunis January 18, 2011. Three opposition ministers quit Tunisia's new coalition government on Tuesday in protest at the presence of members of the party of ousted leader Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali. Police in Tunis repeatedly used teargas in an attempt to break up a protest by several hundred opposition party supporters and trade unionists who labelled the new government a sham. Protesters would scatter, but then regroup to continue. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

45. A protester gestures after riot police broke up a demonstration in downtown Tunis January 18, 2011. Tunisia's new coalition government hit trouble on Tuesday, with three ministers quitting and an opposition party threatening to walk out in protest at the presence of members of the party of the ousted president. Police in Tunis repeatedly used teargas in an attempt to break up a protest by several hundred opposition party supporters and trade unionists who labelled the new government a sham. Protesters would scatter, but then regroup to continue. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

The Tunisia Revolution

46. A protester shows an empty bullet casing after riot police broke up a demonstration in downtown Tunis January 18, 2011. Tunisia's new coalition government hit trouble on Tuesday when four ministers quit and an opposition party threatened to walk out, undermining efforts to restore stability and end unrest on the streets. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Jan 18, 2011