On January 12th 2010 Haiti was hit by a massive earthquake. As it so happens it was the feature of the first ever post on TotallyCoolPix. Now one year later we are back with another feature. Haiti one year after the quake. It tells a sad story. 250.000 People were estimated to be killed in the quake and infrastructure was left destroyed. The bodies are gone, but the infrastructure is a long long way away from begin fixed. As you can see from the one year later images. Hundreds of millions of dollars were raised and a lot of good has been done, but somehow we can’t stop wondering why not more progress has been made.

Haiti one year after the earthquake

01. Men walk past crucifixes at a mass grave site at Titanyen on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince January 11, 2011. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince on Jan 12, 2010. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Haiti one year after the earthquake

02. A view of the Canape-Vert area after the January 2010 earthquake in Port-au-Prince in this combination photo. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton. Pictures taken January 6, 2011 (top) and January 13, 2010. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

03. A view outside the morgue at the general hospital after the January 2010 earthquake in Port-au-Prince is seen in this combination photo. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity Oxfam said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton. Pictures taken January 6, 2011 (top) and January 14, 2010. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

04. A combination photo shows the general view of an area affected by the January 2010 earthquake in Port-au-Prince taken January 6, 2011 (top) and January 13, 2010, where residents search for survivors among the debris of a building after the disaster. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity Oxfam said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

05. A combination photo shows people walking near makeshift shelters after the January 2010 earthquake in Port-au-Prince. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity Oxfam said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton. Pictures taken January 6, 2011 (top) and January 14, 2010. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

06. A combination photo shows a view (top) of the damaged Fort National neighborhood in Port-au-Prince taken on January 6, 2011, with the national telephone company Teleco building in the background, and another of the same area (bottom) taken on February 24, 2010, after the earthquake in Haiti. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity Oxfam said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton. REUTERS/Kena Betancur (top) and Carlos Barria

Haiti one year after the earthquake

07. An earthquake-affected area in downtown Port-au-Prince is seen in this combination photo. Eight months after the magnitude 7 quake that shattered large parts of Port-au-Prince, killing up to 300,000 people, more than 1 million people left homeless by one of the world's worst disasters are still living in the camps and critics say reconstruction efforts have barely gotten under way. Pictures taken March 16, 2010 (top) and September 28, 2010. REUTERS/ Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

08. Residents walk past buildings destroyed during an earthquake in downtown Port-au-Prince in this combination photo. Eight months after the magnitude 7 quake that shattered large parts of Port-au-Prince, killing up to 300,000 people, more than 1 million people left homeless by one of the world's worst disasters are still living in the camps and critics say reconstruction efforts have barely gotten under way. Pictures taken March 16, 2010 (top) and September 29, 2010. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

09. A combination photo shows tents installed by earthquake survivors on March 21, 2010 (top) and a Premier League soccer match at the national stadium in Port-au-Prince September 30, 2010 (bottom). Eight months after the magnitude 7 quake that shattered large parts of Port-au-Prince, killing up to 300,000 people, more than 1 million people left homeless by one of the world's worst disasters are still living in the camps and critics say reconstruction efforts have barely gotten under way. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz (top) and Kena Betancur

Haiti one year after the earthquake

10. A combination photograph shows people walking in front of a badly damaged cathedral building after an earthquake in Port-au-Prince on January 14, 2010 (bottom) and eight months later in a September 30, 2010 photograph. Time after time, Haiti has endured disaster followed by aid that did little to build long-term prosperity. The question is how to break the cycle and rebuild after the quake which killed at least a quarter of a million people and rendered more than a million homeless, leaving vast swathes of Port-au-Prince in ruins. To match Special Report HAITI/ REUTERS/Jorge Silva-Bottom/Eduardo Munoz-Top

Haiti one year after the earthquake

11. A combination photograph shows the badly damaged Cathedral after an earthquake in Port-au-Prince on March 18, 2010 (bottom) and on September 30, 2010 (top). Eight months after the magnitude 7 quake that shattered large parts of Port-au-Prince, killing up to 300,000 people, more than 1 million people left homeless by one of the world's worst disasters are still living in the camps and critics say reconstruction efforts have barely gotten under way. Time after time, Haiti has endured disaster followed by aid that did little to build long-term prosperity. To match Special Report HAITI/ REUTERS/ Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

12. A combination photograph shows Haitians walking in a badly damaged street after an earthquake in Port-au-Prince, on February 3, 2010 (bottom) and seven months later on September 30, 2010 (top). Time after time, Haiti has endured disaster followed by aid that did little to build long-term prosperity. The question is how to break the cycle and rebuild after the quake which killed at least a quarter of a million people and rendered more than a million homeless, leaving vast swathes of Port-au-Prince in ruins. To match Special Report HAITI/ REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz/Files

Haiti one year after the earthquake

13. A combination photograph shows Haitians walking near a damaged clothing store after an earthquake in Port-au-Prince, on January 13, 2010 (bottom) and seven months later on September 30, 2010 (top). Time after time, Haiti has endured disaster followed by aid that did little to build long-term prosperity. The question is how to break the cycle and rebuild after the quake which killed at least a quarter of a million people and rendered more than a million homeless, leaving vast swathes of Port-au-Prince in ruins. To match Special Report HAITI/ REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz/Files

Haiti one year after the earthquake

14. A combination photo shows the presidential palace before (bottom) and after the January 12, 2010 earthquake that struck the Caribbean nation in Port-au-Prince. A major earthquake rocked Haiti, killing possibly thousands of people as it toppled the presidential palace and hillside shanties alike and left the Caribbean nation appealing for international help. Pictures taken January 13, 2010 (top) and May 11, 2006 (bottom). REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

15. A combination photograph shows the badly damaged presidential palace after an earthquake in Port-au-Prince, on January 13, 2010 (bottom) and eight months later on September 30, 2010 (top). Time after time, Haiti has endured disaster followed by aid that did little to build long-term prosperity. The question is how to break the cycle and rebuild after the quake which killed at least a quarter of a million people and rendered more than a million homeless, leaving vast swathes of Port-au-Prince in ruins. To match Special Report HAITI/ REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz/Files

Haiti one year after the earthquake

16. A hawker prepares sausages for sale in a street market in Port-au-Prince January 5, 2011. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

17. An earthquake survivor rests in a camp which was set up after the January 2010 earthquake in Port-au-Prince January 7, 2011. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

18. A man listens to the radio inside his battery-charging business at Petion Ville Club golf course IDP camp in Port-au-Prince January 7, 2011. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton. REUTERS/Kena Betancur

Haiti one year after the earthquake

19. Haitian children play in an internally displaced persons camp at in Port-au-Prince January 7, 2011. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton. REUTERS/Kena Betancur

Haiti one year after the earthquake

20. A Haitian man carries a dead pig for cooking in Port-au-Prince January 8, 2011. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

21. Orich Florestal (L), 24 and Rosemond Altidon, 22, stand on the edge of their partially destroyed apartment of Port-au-Prince January 9, 2011. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince on Jan 12, 2010. REUTERS/Allison Shelley

Haiti one year after the earthquake

22. Haitian women organize groceries to sell in Port-au-Prince January 9, 2011. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince on Jan 12, 2010. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

23. A Haitian woman takes money from the pocket of her drunk son on a street in Port-au-Prince January 9, 2011. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince on Jan 12, 2010. REUTERS/Kena Betancur

Haiti one year after the earthquake

24. A woman prays among the rubble of the damaged main cathedral in downtown Port-au-Prince, January 9, 2011. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince on Jan 12, 2010. REUTERS/Allison Shelley

Haiti one year after the earthquake

25. Haitian evangelicals pray during a mass to remember earthquake victims at the national stadium in Port-au-Prince January 9, 2011. When the ground shook Haiti on a Caribbean winter afternoon a year ago, toppling homes like cards and killing around 250,000 people, world leaders promised quick action to ease the human tragedy and rebuild the country. A year on, the Western Hemisphere's poorest country is still reeling from the earthquake, and the international community's capacity to deliver and sustain aid effectively is being sorely tested. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Haiti one year after the earthquake

26. A boy prays at the Festival of Hope, a rally led by Franklin Graham, son of U.S. evangelist Billy Graham, at a soccer stadium in downtown Port-au-Prince January 9, 2011. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince on Jan 12, 2010. REUTERS/Allison Shelley

Haiti one year after the earthquake

27. Elonet Bellrit, 60,carries cement blocks from his handmade factory in Port-au-Prince January 10, 2011. When the ground shook Haiti on a Caribbean winter afternoon a year ago, toppling homes like cards and killing around 250,000 people, world leaders promised quick action to ease the human tragedy and rebuild the country. REUTERS/Kena Betancur

Haiti one year after the earthquake

28. A Haitian boy cries while sleeping at a cholera treatment center of Medecins Sans Frontieres MSF (Doctors Without Borders) in Port-au-Prince January 10, 2011. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince on Jan 12, 2010. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Haiti one year after the earthquake

29. Boys on their way to fill water jugs pause near a cross adorned with black cloth on a hill overlooking a burial site outside of Port-au-Prince January 10, 2011. Mass graves of victims of the January 12, 2010 earthquake and the cholera epidemic are found buried at the site. REUTERS/Allison Shelley

Haiti one year after the earthquake

30. A combination photograph shows a fire burning at the Hyppolite iron market in downtown Port-au-Prince on January 29, 2010 (top), and people looking at the newly reconstructed iron market which will be inaugurated on Tuesday in downtown Port-au-Prince January 10, 2011. The historic trading center was originally constructed in the 1890's and has been rebuilt this year after a fire levelled it shortly after the January 12, 2010 earthquake. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Haiti one year after the earthquake

31. The newly reconstructed Hyppolite Iron Market is reflected in a puddle in downtown Port-au-Prince January 10, 2011. The historic trading center was originally constructed in the 1890's and has been rebuilt this year after a fire levelled it shortly after the January 12, 2010 earthquake. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Haiti one year after the earthquake

32. Prothesis are seen inside the Handicap International center in Port-au-Prince January 10, 2011. Thousands of people lost limbs in the January 12, 2010 earthquake, which left more than 1 million Haitians homeless and living in misery in the already poor, calamity-prone Caribbean nation. The center, run by Handicap International, provides rehabilitation, therapy and prosthetic limbs for amputees. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

33. Haitians mourn the death of their relatives during a ceremony to remember the victims of the January 2010 earthquake in Titanyen January 11, 2011. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince on January 12, 2010. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz

Haiti one year after the earthquake

34. Crucifixes are seen at a mass grave site at Titanyen, on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince January 11, 2011. Haiti will this week mark the first anniversary of the earthquake that killed around 250,000 people and wrecked much of the capital Port-au-Prince on Jan 12, 2010. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Haiti one year after the earthquake

35. A woman prays in front of the Haiti cathedral, which was destroyed in the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince January 12, 2011. As Haitians mark the anniversary on Wednesday of the earthquake that flattened much of the capital Port-au-Prince, hopes that a better nation could rise from the rubble have given way to a crushing sense of bitterness and despair. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Haiti one year after the earthquake

36. A girl gazes out of a bus window in front of the Haitian national flag at the National Palace during the one-year anniversary of the 2010 quake in downtown Port-au-Prince, January 12, 2011. Thousands took part in memorial services, including one at the ruins of the National Cathedral in the wrecked capital Port-au-Prince attended by the Papal envoy to Haiti, other religious leaders, government officials and foreign dignitaries. REUTERS/Allison Shelley

Haiti one year after the earthquake

37. A woman prays in front of the destroyed Haiti cathedral during the one-year anniversary of the 2010 quake in Port-au-Prince January 12, 2011. Haitians, many dressed in white in mourning, honored victims of the devastating 2010 earthquake on Wednesday in a somber anniversary clouded by pessimism over slow reconstruction and political uncertainty. REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Haiti one year after the earthquake

38. People cheer as a woman dances in front of the heavily damaged National Palace during a memorial held to commemorate victims of the 2010 earthquake, in downtown Port-au-Prince, January 12, 2011. Haiti mourned more than 300,000 victims of its devastating earthquake in a somber, poignant one-year anniversary clouded by pessimism over slow reconstruction and political uncertainty. REUTERS/Allison Shelley

Haiti one year after the earthquake

39. Haitians take part in a vigil in honor of quake victims in Port-au-Prince January 12, 2011. Haiti mourned more than 300,000 victims of its devastating 2010 earthquake on Wednesday in a somber one-year anniversary clouded by pessimism over slow reconstruction and political uncertainty. REUTERS/Jorge Silva