The 11th of November marks Veterans Day in the US and Armistice Day (or Remembrance Day) in many Commonwealth countries. It marks the end of the First World War in 1918, but has since grown into a day to remember all those who have fought and fallen in the wars that have come and gone. And those who are still fighing in wars such as in Iraq or Afghanistan. In the almost 100 years since the end of the First World War a lot has changed. Better and deadlier weapons, better communications and better medical aid, but one thing has not changed. Fighting a war is as much about firing your weapons as it is about winning the war of the mind. It was like that in the muddy trenches of Flanders and it is still like that in the dust of Afghanistan. One such battle of the mind is fought through the use of graffiti.

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti by a previous deployment of the U.S Marine Corps's, adorns the walls at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti left behind by Taliban fighters remain on the walls of a compound now used as a command center for the U.S Marine Corps's First Battalion, Eighth Marines at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti reading The Few, The Proud, by a previous deployment of the U.S Marine Corps's, adorns the walls at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti by a previous deployment of the U.S Marine Corps's, adorns the walls at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti by a previous deployment of the U.S Marine Corps's, adorns the walls at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti reading Get Hard, Stay hard, by a previous deployment of the U.S Marine Corps's, adorns the walls at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY CONFLICT)

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti left behind by Taliban fighters remains on the walls of a compound now used as a command center for the U.S Marine Corps's First Battalion, Eighth Marines at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY CONFLICT SOCIETY)

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti by a previous deployment of the U.S Marine Corps's, adorns the walls at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti left behind by Taliban fighters remains on the walls of a compound now used as a command center for the U.S Marine Corps's First Battalion, Eighth Marines at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010.Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti left behind by Taliban fighters remains on the walls of a compound now used as a command center for the U.S Marine Corps's First Battalion, Eighth Marines at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010.Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY CONFLICT SOCIETY)

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti left behind by Taliban fighters remains on the walls of a compound now used as a command center for the U.S Marine Corps's First Battalion, Eighth Marines at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010.Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti left behind by Taliban fighters remains on the walls of a compound now used as a command center for the U.S Marine Corps's First Battalion, Eighth Marines at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti left behind by Taliban fighters remains on the walls of a compound now used as a command center for the U.S Marine Corps's First Battalion, Eighth Marines at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti by a previous deployment of the U.S Marine Corps's, adorns the walls at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti left behind by Taliban fighters remains on the walls of a compound now used as a command center for the U.S Marine Corps's First Battalion, Eighth Marines at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti left behind by Taliban fighters remains on the walls of a compound now used as a command center for the U.S Marine Corps's First Battalion, Eighth Marines at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti by a previous deployment of the U.S Marine Corps's, adorns the walls at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 10, 2010. Musa Qala is an important battleground in the war against Taliban insurgents and the narcotics industry. The town has changed hands several times, most recently in December 2007 when Afghan and international forces retook the town from the Taliban. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Coloured chalk graffiti marks the walls in the quarters of the U.S. Female Engagement Team of First Battalion, Eighth Marines at their base at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Layers of graffiti dating back to a previous British deployment mark the walls at Musa Qala district center, now used by U.S. Marines, in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Coloured chalk graffiti mark the walls in the quarters of the U.S. Female Engagement Team (FET) of First Battalion, Eighth Marines at their base at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Personal items hang next to coloured chalk graffiti on the walls in the quarters of the U.S. Female Engagement Team (FET) of First Battalion, Eighth Marines at their base at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

A fly swatter (L) hangs next to coloured chalk graffiti on the walls in the quarters of the U.S. Female Engagement Team (FET) of First Battalion, Eighth Marines at their base at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Coloured chalk graffiti marks the walls in the quarters of the U.S. Female Engagement Team (FET) of First Battalion, Eighth Marines at their base at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Coloured chalk graffiti mark the walls in the quarters of the U.S. Female Engagement Team (FET) of First Battalion, Eighth Marines at their base at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Coloured chalk graffiti marks the walls in the quarters of the U.S. Female Engagement Team (FET) of First Battalion, Eighth Marines at their base at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti dating back to a previous British deployment marks the walls at Musa Qala district center, now used by U.S. Marines, in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Graffiti dating back to a previous British deployment and depicting a television playing the long-running drama Coronation Street marks the walls at Musa Qala district center, now used by U.S. Marines, in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Afghan Graffiti Wars

Coloured chalk graffiti marks the walls in the quarters of the U.S. Female Engagement Team (FET) of First Battalion, Eighth Marines at their base at Musa Qala in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province November 13, 2010. REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly

Nov 11, 2010